Month: September 2017

A Spoonful of Sutras Makes the Yoga Go Down

If you are a yoga teacher or devout student you have heard of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. If you aren’t as familiar here is a short explanation: it is a guidebook to yogic philosophy, living, and the eight limbs of yoga (ashtanga). It was written by a man named Patanjali many, many, many, many, many, many, many years ago.  The word sutra means thread, and you can think about these words as threads of wisdom that weave your yoga life into a beautiful tapestry. If you want a little bit  more then click here.

Until I went to yoga teacher training I had never heard of these sutras, even though I was a “serious” student. I had a read a few yoga books like Chakra Yoga by Alan Finger, browsed Light on Yoga, and a few other small books. The Yoga Sutras was part of our required reading list for my program and I’ll be honest–I didn’t read them. I got a copy, the wrong one, it was so confusing (as they are very difficult to understand naturally) that I just gave up. I never made it past Sutra 1.1: now is the time for yoga.  If I wanted any info on a sutra I would just read a Clif Notes version on Yoga Journal or Yoga International. Last year I decided I would try the sutras again. So I bought the copy that I was suppose to in teacher training with every intention of picking it up–I never did. It collected dust with all my other books that I don’t read, haven’t read yet, kinesology textbooks, and poetry.

 

IMG_20170522_150411922

 

As I have talked about before on my social media pages my practice began to shift around last summer and hasn’t stopped. My practice grew deeper, not just physically but mentally. I was having questions about yoga all while facing my recovery and dealing with some serious anxiety. Then when I  moved to OKC I started teaching more than I have before and my physical practice became more internal, so I picked up my sutras. I made a commitment to read a sutra a week. I was good for two weeks then I took time off, because #lifehappens, but I picked it back up because I am really committed to this.

 

IMG_20170830_121714608

 

My study is very simple. I have three versions of the yoga sutras (pictured below) and I read a sutra each week (or attempt to). I make stars with pink ink in the margins denoting phrases of super importance, highligting sanskrit words (always working on deepening those skills), and things that are very important I underline in black ink. I read the same sutra in each version and compare the them. Then in my own journal I write down in my own words what each sutra means. By writing them in my own language it helps to cement them into my mind and spirit to let me fully live them.

While I’m only five deep they have definitely been challenging and changing. Especially Sutra 1.3-1.4. They will be getting their own blog post at some point. I’m looking forward to where this will take me. If you have read or are reading the Yoga Sutras share your favorite resource in the comments section.

 

IMG_20170919_133222003

Advertisements

Stepping into Karma

“Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.”-Step 12, EDA Version

karma: Sanskrit for action

 

In many different spiritual paths we are called to help and be of service to others. Through serving others we are able to show people that kindness does exist in what can be seen as a cruel world. That there is something more to life than just the everyday drudgery of Facebook scrolling, Neflixing, coffee drinking, working that 9-5, and sleeping. For those of us who have chosen a recovered life it is imperative that we serve others who were once (still) like us by sharing our story and helping them out.

Step 12 is an action step calling for us to be stewards and it reminds me of another action: karma. We are all familiar with the concept of karma, but the concept of “what goes around comes around” isn’t what karma truly is. My favorite explanation of karma is by Jack Kornfield in his book, A Path With Heart, “karma means that nothing arises by itself. Every experience is conditioned by that which precedes it. Thus our life is a series of interrelated patterns” (273). Kornfield later states, “the intention or attitude that we bring to each situation of life determines the kind of karma we want to create. Day to day, moment to  moment, we can begin to see the creation of the patterns of karma based on the intentions in our heart” (279).

 

singing-bowl-2576487_640

 

This is precisely what those of us in recovery are to do with our daily lives while waving our recovery flags. Our hearts are to be so devoted to recovery that everything we do is to be intentional. Our intentions for sharing our stories isn’t to be boastful and “hey, look at me” it is to be honest, real, and selfless. We are intentionally making new patterns of behavior to correct patterns of the past.  It reminds me of a quote from my EDA Book, “As we begin to realize that our world has been changed for the better through the step work we have done, we simultaneously become aware that the gift of life in recovery comes with the responsibility to share it with others. Now that we have begun to experience healing in our lives we must extend a hand to those who still suffer”.

I hadn’t really thought much about my own personal recovery lately. I have been falling short on my steps–honestly I haven’t been living a 12 Step life. I lost my mission that I sat out to do when I first began this blog. I began imageoftheheart to share my experience with others who suffer or know people who are suffering, to help them make sense of this disordered world. And what have I been doing? Nothing. I haven’t been generating any  karma, just a pool of nothing.

 

volunteers-2654003_640

 

Over the past month people have reached out to me. I have answered questions on how to support loved ones with EDs. I’ve shared posts with those who are new to recovery. I even helped someone seek recovery. Between the Facebook messages and emails something began to stir within me. Something that I haven’t felt in a long time. Purpose. Direction. A moving current of karma. This karma current swelled within my heart and helped me get back on track. To start the steps over, to be intentional in my recovery and not just throw it to the side like stale piece of bread.

If what Kornfield says is true, “The heart is our garden, and along with each action there is an intention that is planted like a seed. The result of the patterns of our karma is the fruit of these seeds.(277)”. I want to sow beautiful fruit-ripe, juicy, organic recovery fruit. I am tired of have OK, slightly spotty recovery fruit. Since this is a new month I am taking accountability for my actions and starting over. Tilling up my soil and ready to sow new fruit that is sweet with karma.

How is the karma in your life? Are you generating positive action while sowing sweet fruit or are you just skirting by and sowing OK fruit? Are living with intention and removing yourself out of your actions towards others? If you aren’t happy with the answers or the taste of your fruit then take some time to re-focus. Make an intention to be intentional. Lend a helping hand to someone in need, share your story, hold space for others. Generate karma.

 

meditation-2151342_640